Museum's winning bid for Faith, Hope and Charity

The Faith, Hope and Charity window was designed for the now deconsecrated St Paul’s Church, Battersea

The Faith, Hope and Charity window was designed for the now deconsecrated St Paul’s Church, Battersea, London - Credit: Stained Glass Museum

Multiple funders chipped in £11,000 to secure at auction a rare window for the Stained Glass Museum at Ely.  

The window was designed by Irish Arts & Crafts artist Wilhelmina Geddes. 

Dr Jasmine Allen, director and curator at The Stained Glass Museum said: “Geddes’ stained glass works are rarely available to acquire, and her output was relatively small.  

“We are delighted to have acquired this window, which depicts the three theological virtues, Faith, Hope and Charity (Love), for The Stained Glass Museum’s permanent collection.”  

The museum was supported in its bid by Art Fund and the Arts Council England / V&A Purchase Grant Fund. 

The work was the last window designed and cartooned by the renowned artist (1887-1955).  

The Faith, Hope and Charity window was designed for the now deconsecrated St Paul’s Church, Battersea, London.  

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Wilhelmina was an important figure in the Irish Arts and Crafts movement and 20th century British stained glass revival.  

She was amongst the first generation of women stained glass artists who benefitted from professional training and achieving recognition in their own right. 

Wilhelmina was among the artists whose careers benefitted from increased commissions in the periods after the First and Second World Wars.  

The Faith, Hope and Charity window was designed and cartooned in 1955 and turned out to be Geddes’ final commission.  

The window was made to Geddes’ designs shortly after her death by friend and colleague at The Glass House, Charles F. Blakeman in 1956.  

In the same year the three-light window was installed in the north aisle of St Paul’s Church, Battersea.  

In 1972 St Paul’s Church was united with nearby St Peter’s and Geddes’ Faith, Hope and Charity window was blocked and boarded up.  

The window was removed when the church was sold for mixed development and converted into private residencies and a nursery, seven years ago.  

Dr Allen said: “It is an excellent addition to the museum’s collection of Arts & Crafts windows designed by women artists.  

“As Geddes’ final commission it is also an important example of her later work, and an interesting treatment of this subject.”  

According to Christian theology and philosophy, the three theological virtues of Faith, Hope and Charity (Love) are associated with salvation resulting from the grace of God.