Witchford College, which ‘requires improvement’ is now raising its game says Ofsted inspector

PUBLISHED: 11:42 24 November 2015 | UPDATED: 11:42 24 November 2015

Head Teacher at Witchford Village College, Chris Terry

Head Teacher at Witchford Village College, Chris Terry

Archant

A college, which was warned by inspectors it needs improving, has been told it is taking “effective action” to tackle changes.

A college, which was warned by inspectors it needs improving, has been told it is taking “effective action” to tackle changes.

Witchford College was told in February that it needed to shape up and focus on the achievement of disadvantaged pupils.

Ofsted inspectors returned this month and found that changes were being made but more still needed to be done to make sure it became worthy of receiving the Ofsted “good” goal.

Inspector Prue Rayner said: “Senior leaders and governors are taking effective action to tackle the areas requiring improvement identified at the recent inspection in order to become a good school.”

However, she added that in order to improve they needed to “set sharper targets so that the impact of the wide range of extra support pupils, particularly the disadvantaged, receive is fully understood.”

They also need to “ensure that all leaders and governors know where resources, support and change are most needed so improving achievement is sustained.”

The number of children passing five GCSEs at grade A to C has gone up but it is still below the national average, Mrs Rayner’s report said, who added that the number of pupils has increased by almost a quarter in the last two years and students who receive free school meals has gone up by about a third.

Short term support is offered via out of school hours to help pupils catch up on gaps in their learning and the vice principal monitoring the work is “doing so very rigorously,” she said.

“Additional support for pupils needing to catch up by learning mentors is also proving to be effective in developing their engagement and confidence.

“In some of the teaching seen during my visit, it was evident that disadvantaged pupils’ needs were understood well and that this finely tuned approach, coupled often with well-planned additional pastoral and family support, is the reason they are achieving higher standards.”


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