We won't let them beat us'

PUBLISHED: 10:43 12 July 2007 | UPDATED: 12:39 04 May 2010

Stuart Limpus

Stuart Limpus

THE Bishop of Ely, the Rt Rev Dr Anthony Russell, has appealed for people to remain calm as nearby Cambridge remains at the centre of police investigations into the failed London and Glasgow bomb attacks. Dr Bilal Abdulla, Dr Kafeel Ahmed, his brother Dr

Laura Harvey

THE Bishop of Ely, the Rt Rev Dr Anthony Russell, has appealed for people to remain calm as nearby Cambridge remains at the centre of police investigations into the failed London and Glasgow bomb attacks.

Dr Bilal Abdulla, Dr Kafeel Ahmed, his brother Dr Sabeel Ahmed, and Dr Mohammed Asha, who once worked at Addenbrooke's Hospital, are all thought to have spent time in Cambridge, and are being held over the bomb plots.

Dr Russell said: "Many people will be shocked by the news that several of those arrested in connection with the recent attempted car bombings had lived in Cambridge, and at least one of these had worked at Addenbrooke's Hospital.

"It is important to remember that such acts of terrorism are condemned by both Christian and Muslim communities alike. Both communities continue to work together and I share the concern that these events could have an adverse effect on patient relationships.

Murray Lenton

"I call on everyone to recognise the considerable debt we owe all those nurses, doctors and surgeons who work in the health service and care for those who are sick or injured."

Reporter ADAM LAZZARI went out in Ely to ask people if the threat of terrorism was affecting their lives.

Stuart Limpus, 59, from ­Wimblington:

Roger Davis

"I work in Ely and travel around quite a bit, but I'm not terribly worried about the threat of terrorism. I grew up in Cambridge and I went there yesterday and I was really surprised by the number of tourists around.

"I do find it shocking that Cambridge has been linked with terrorism. You see on television about the terrorist activity but you never think anything will happen to you.

"I wouldn't be intimidated and we all have to get on with our lives because otherwise the terrorists will be encouraged to carry on. Besides, you could be knocked down by a car any day."

Michael Hewitt

Laura Harvey, 31, from ­Littleport:

"I grew up in London and I'm used to having bomb scares from when I was at school because of the IRA threat. I was actually quite shocked when I moved here to discover the schools had fire bells but not bomb bells, like in London.

"Terrorist threats never stopped me from getting on with my life when I was a child, so they certainly won't now I'm an adult."

Celia White

Murray Lenton, 46, from Ely:

"I think we should all be a bit worried about it and we've only got our own Government to blame because of what's happening in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"The American government funded the IRA and when things backfire like with what happened to the Twin Towers of the World Trade Centre they don't like it and react aggressively. Tony Blair was too stupid to see that and he followed them and now he's put us all at risk of attack.

"You have to go about your daily business and can't worry too much. The victims of these attacks just happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time."

Roger Davis, 61, from Pymoor:

"I grew up with the threat of the IRA in London and I can't imagine any threat around here being as great as it was down there. I'm used to it all and just get on with my life."

Michael Hewitt, 70, from ­Sutton:

"I'm not unduly shocked that Cambridge has been linked with the terrorists - there could be links to all parts of the country. I travel by aeroplane a lot and feel reassured when I'm stopped and searched at the airport."

Celia White, 21, from Ely:

"I'm not worried about the situation in Ely. I might think about it more if I'm going to London or another big city when there's a high alert. You see it on the news but just don't think it would happen to you.

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