Water Fight At Charity Centre Ends In Assault

PUBLISHED: 11:44 03 July 2009 | UPDATED: 10:56 04 May 2010

A WATER fight at a charity centre put Thomas Turner into such a rage that he attacked a man who doused him with cold water. Shocked by his drenching, Turner grabbed Anthony Starenczak, punched him in the head, and then kicked his arms and leg. Staff at B

A WATER fight at a charity centre put Thomas Turner into such a rage that he attacked a man who doused him with cold water.

Shocked by his drenching, Turner grabbed Anthony Starenczak, punched him in the head, and then kicked his arms and leg.

Staff at Branching Out in Littleport, a charity that assists people with learning difficulties, pulled Turner off his victim, Ely magistrates were told on Thursday.

Turner, 22, of New Barns Avenue, Ely, admitted assaulted Mr Starenczak on May 8.

After reading a psychologist's report, magistrates gave Turner an 18-month community order with supervision and a mental health treatment requirement, and ordered him to pay £60 costs.

"We are not awarding compensation, because it was water being thrown at the defendant that sparked this off, and the injuries caused were not major," added presiding magistrate Hamish Ross.

Prosecuting, Laura Mardell said Turner and his victim had spent the afternoon together at Branching Out, when they got involved in a water fight.

"The complainant threw water over him, and the defendant grabbed him with one hand and punched him in the head three times," she said. "The complainant was then kicked by the defendant four or five times, the complainant curled up to protect himself while the kicks landed on his arms and legs."

After staff stopped the incident, Mr Starenczak was left with a sore and tender face, added Miss Mardell.

Mitigating, Jacqui Baldwin said Turner could not remember kicking, but accepted the Crown's version of events.

"He flew into a rage," she explained. "It was the shock of the cold water; he punched out at the victim.

"My client has issues of anger linked to his learning difficulties, and suffers from ADHD and Tourette's syndrome. He is not going to get better; he will always require support in the community.


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