The 32nd Ely Folk Festival makes for ‘magnificent’ weekend

Festival fun in Ely. PHOTO: Andrew Moore.

Festival fun in Ely. PHOTO: Andrew Moore. - Credit: Archant

Sunshine, great music and a carnival atmosphere helped make the 32nd Ely Folk Festival a success.

Ross Ainslie & Jarleth Henderson. PHOTO: Andrew Moore.

Ross Ainslie & Jarleth Henderson. PHOTO: Andrew Moore. - Credit: Archant

With more than 35 acts to enjoy over the weekend, visitors relaxed on the grass outside the marquees or sought shade inside while listening to some of the best folk and roots music around.

Fionnuala Lennon, from the festival organising committee, said: “It was a really great festival. The music was magnificent and everyone enjoyed themselves.

O'Hooley & Tidow. PHOTO: Andrew Moore.

O'Hooley & Tidow. PHOTO: Andrew Moore. - Credit: Archant

“We’re already thinking about how we can top it for 2018. We’d like to thank all the volunteers who make the festival happen and ensure it goes off smoothly.”

She added: “The music was rich and diverse from the Americana sounds of Alden Patterson and Dashwood who opened the festival on Friday evening to the Spooky Men’s Chorale on Saturday evening with their amazing chorale range, to folk superstar Seth Lakeman and his band on Sunday evening who had the audience in the main marquee on its feet dancing along to a spellbinding set.

Seth Lakeman band. PHOTO: Andrew Moore.

Seth Lakeman band. PHOTO: Andrew Moore. - Credit: Archant


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“Hot Rock Pilgrims provided some sensational bluegrass, Elvis Fontenot and the Sugar Bees brought Cajun and zydeco sounds, and Cambridge-based Bophouseblue played a storming blues set on Sunday.

“In Ely city centre, over 20 morris dance teams delighted crowds as they paraded around the streets on Saturday morning with their painted faces, eye-catching costumes, rhythmic music, and dexterous dances.

Ely Folk Festival 2017. PHOTO: Andrew Moore.

Ely Folk Festival 2017. PHOTO: Andrew Moore. - Credit: Archant

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“Pirates seemed to invade the festival at one point as younger festival visitors paraded around the site in tricorns and cutlasses made in the kids’ craft area.”

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