Tank upgrade bids to tackle climate change in £380k scheme

Anglian Water to upgrade storm tank in Ely

Work to upgrade a storm tank at Ely water recycling centre is part of a programme of work across the Anglia region totalling over £100 million, according to Anglian Water. - Credit: Archant

Work to upgrade a storm tank as part of a £380,000 investment scheme is due to take place. 

Anglian Water plans to upgrade the tank at its Ely water recycling centre on Angel Drove from September 13. 

The Ely scheme is part of a programme of over £100 million of work to install new storm water storage facilities at 110 water recycling sites in the region. 

Dr Lucinda Gilfoyle, head of environmental quality for Anglian Water, said: “Being able to store excess water on our sites means that less ends up in our rivers, seas and some of the unique habitats in our region.”   

The project at Ely aims to increase the capacity of its storm tank by nearly 60 per cent as part of Anglian Water’s Water Industry National Environment Programme (WINEP) between 2020-25. 


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The work, due to finish by the end of this year, bids to prepare for the impact of weather events caused by climate change, such as drought and flooding. 

With an increased capacity, Anglian Water said it will allow the tank to hold more storm water during extreme weather, before being returned to nearby watercourses. 

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Dr Gilfoyle said: “River flows were above 300pc of their long-term average in some areas, and our sewers handled four billion more litres of wastewater per day in January 2021 than in January 2020.   

“Not only this, but we have a rapidly growing population meaning our region is expected to grow by 175,000 homes in the next five years.   

“More homes mean more hard, impermeable surfaces and therefore an additional risk of flooding.” 

Dr Gilfoyle said that due to climate change, residents should expect “more bouts of extreme weather, sudden downpours and rising sea levels”. 

Because of this, she added that stronger infrastructure is needed. 

“More homes mean more hard, impermeable surfaces and therefore an additional risk of flooding,” said Dr Gilfoyle. 

“All of these factors mean that we need resilient infrastructure that can rise to the challenge and help us protect the environment at the same time. 

“Being able to store excess water on our sites means that less ends up in our rivers, seas and some of the unique habitats in our region.” 

Anglian Water’s WINEP is aimed at protecting the environment and improving river water quality. 

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