Police discover driver by phone left in car wreck

DRINK driver Lee Wiseman scrambled out of the boot of a car he crashed into a ditch, but left a string of clues to his identity. A single shoe and blood were found in the Peugeot 205 turned on its roof in a ditch along Grange Lane in Littleport. And Wisem

DRINK driver Lee Wiseman scrambled out of the boot of a car he crashed into a ditch, but left a string of clues to his identity.

A single shoe and blood were found in the Peugeot 205 turned on its roof in a ditch along Grange Lane in Littleport.

And Wiseman had left his mobile phone behind, so police were able to use numbers stored on the machine to track him down.

Appearing at Ely courthouse on Thursday, 23-year-old Wiseman, of Friars Place, Littleport, admitted driving with a breath test reading almost three times the legal alcohol limit. He further admitted driving the car belonging to his friend Adam Scott without insurance or a driving licence.


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Police officers were concerned about the car's driver when they found the damaged vehicle on October 11, said prosecutor Matthew Bradbury.

When they found Wiseman, his England shirt and jeans were covered in mud, and he had sustained cuts and scratches on his head, face and arms. His breath test reading was 101 mcgs of alcohol in 100 mls of breath, when the legal limit is 35 mcgs.

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Earlier that evening, Wiseman and Mr Scott had been at Strikes in Ely to watch a football match between England and Croatia, explained Michael Judkins, mitigating.

Wiseman had a lot to drink, and left in a taxi. Later that evening, Wiseman was offered the use of his friend's car.

"It was the amount of alcohol both men had drunk that impaired their judgement," said Mr Judkins. "My client was horrified to discover how much he was over the limit. It was a very stupid, rash and dangerous act on his part."

Wiseman was ordered to perform 150 hours unpaid community work; he was banned from driving for two years and told to pay £60 costs.

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