Man With Crowbar Was Trying To Protect His Mum

PUBLISHED: 15:32 07 April 2010 | UPDATED: 13:18 02 June 2010

FREDERICK Upton was trying to protect his mother when he produced a crow bar and used plain English to disperse a group in Stretham High Street, a court was told. Upton had rushed to the scene because his mother had been worried about people congregatin

FREDERICK Upton was trying to protect his mother when he produced a crow bar and used "plain English" to disperse a group in Stretham High Street, a court was told.

Upton had rushed to the scene because his mother had been worried about people congregating outside her home.

Just two days earlier there had been an ugly scene in the village, Ely magistrates heard. During that incident, Upton's brother and his brother's father-in-law had been hospitalised after suffering injuries.

"He received a phone call from his mother, saying part of the group involved in the incident on January 1 were outside her house," solicitor Chris Casey explained.

"His mother panicked, and he turned up there. He got out of his van and went over to the group and used plain English to tell them to leave the area.

"The group then dispersed, he had told them the police were coming, and they should go."

Upton, 25, of Vermuyden Gardens, Sutton, admitted possessing an offensive weapon in Stretham High Street on January 3.

Prosecuting, Laura Mardell said a large public order incident in Stretham on New Year's Day had resulted in people being arrested, and there was an ongoing investigation.

Upton had not been involved in that incident, but on January 3 some people involved in the earlier fracas were out on the village street.

"It was around midday when a large group of people congregated in the High Street," she said. "A yellow pick-up truck arrived, and two men got out, including the defendant.

"A resident in the street heard what was going on, and called the police. A witness saw Upton get out of the vehicle with a crow bar, but it was not used to threaten anyone, or damage property."

Solicitor Chris Casey added: "My client grabbed something out of the back of the van, and went over to them. There were no threats made."

Giving Upton a one-year conditional discharge, presiding magistrate Sue Griffin said: "You were responding to your mother's anxiety, and we understand that is a human response. We are satisfied you did not plan any of this, and responded in an impulsive way."

The court ordered Upton to pay £85 costs and the crow bar will be forfeited and destroyed.


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