Littleport man was "extremely depraved" say police

PUBLISHED: 12:39 19 April 2012

Anthony Newman

Anthony Newman

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"Anthony Newman is an extremely depraved individual who abused his position of trust to exploit two young boys for his own sexual gratification. This was a complex investigation and we are pleased with the sentence imposed by the court."

A LITTLEPORT man described by police as an “extremely depraved individual” has been jailed for 14 years for sexually abusing two young boys. Anthony Newman, of Parsons Lane, pleaded guilty to 12 counts of sexually abusing the boys who were aged just six and 10 when the offences first took place.

Newman, a former sailor, came to police attention when his victims, now adult men, came forward to report the abuse they had suffered in childhood.

Det Con Melissa Carr, who investigated the case, said after the hearing on April 13: “Anthony Newman is an extremely depraved individual who abused his position of trust to exploit two young boys for his own sexual gratification. This was a complex investigation and we are pleased with the sentence imposed by the court.”

Swindon Crown Court heard that Newman befriended the boys, from the Swindon area where he was living at the time, and then continued to abuse them over a number of years.

Stephen Dent, prosecuting, told the court the abuse began in the early 1970s when Newman was aged 19 or 20. The first boy, aged 10, had lost a close family member when he was befriended by Newman who often bought him alcohol. The victim reported the abuse in 2006 and told police that Newman regularly had sex with him, but Newman denied the accusations and it wasn’t until 2009 when the second man approached police that the full extent of the abuse came to light.

The second boy, aged six, was befriended by Newman in the late 1980s and was abused by him for a number of years.

He told police that Newman has abused him in the late 1980s and early 1990s when he was just six years old and the abuse continued for a number of years.

Ian Halliday, defending, said the offences were committed when his client was a young man and there was no threat of violence against the boys. He told the court that Newman was now in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease and was suffering from depression, anxiety, sleep apnoea and high blood pressure.

Sentencing Newman judge Douglas Field told him: “You took advantage of this very young [his first victim] and vulnerable boy to satisfy your perverted sexual desires. It has had a long lasting affect on him. For years he was unable to tell anyone about what you had done to him. He developed drug problems and alcohol problems. He has had a long wait to see justice done in this case.”

He then said of the offences against the second boy: “You groomed him by talking to him in a sexual way which no doubt had the affect of him feeling what was done to him was normal. He also turned to drugs as it seems to blank out the memory.”

Newman will also be on the sex offender’s register for life.

After the sentencing, Det Con Carr added: “I would like to take this opportunity to commend the two victims in this case for the bravery and dignity they have shown throughout the judicial process. Without their continued assistance, this sentence would not have been possible and we hope that it will offer these men some piece of mind as they continue to rebuild their lives.

“Sadly, there are still young people who have been or are being sexually abused and exploited. I would like to appeal to these young people to tell someone about the abuse. If you don’t want to report it to police, you can tell a trusted adult who can report it on your behalf, not only so that the offender can be identified but to ensure that you are provided with the appropriate help and support.

“If you feel unable to speak to anyone, please contact the NSPCC or Childline. These organisations are completely confidential and will be able to advise on the support that is available to you.”

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