Symbolic Japanese paper cranes exhibition raises awareness of recovery from post natal depression by Ely mum

Cranes exhibition raises awareness of post natal depression by Laura Pearson-Clark

Cranes exhibition raises awareness of post natal depression by Laura Pearson-Clark - Credit: Archant

A mum held an exhibition to raise awareness for others to spread the positive message you can recover from post natal depression.

Laura Pearson-Clark and her 1,000 cranes which featured in an exhibition

Laura Pearson-Clark and her 1,000 cranes which featured in an exhibition - Credit: Archant

Laura Pearson-Clark held a display of 1,000 cranes as part of World Mental health Day.

Laura said: “I read up about the Japanese legend that if you make 1,000 paper origami cranes you will receive eternal good luck.

“The cranes are also known for symbolising resilience and well being.”

Laura Pearson-Clark and her 1,000 cranes which featured in an exhibition

Laura Pearson-Clark and her 1,000 cranes which featured in an exhibition - Credit: Archant

After the birth of her daughter in 2014, Laura battled with post natal depression for the first two years and was referred to an art therapist in 2016.


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She says the 12 week art therapy NHS course was a turning point and the beginning of a full recovery journey.

“It was in my penultimate art therapy session that I discussed an idea I had for a new art piece,” she said.

Laura Pearson-Clark and her 1,000 cranes which featured in an exhibition

Laura Pearson-Clark and her 1,000 cranes which featured in an exhibition - Credit: Archant

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“On the exhibition days people saw 1,000 cranes hanging, learning the art of “mindfoldness” and how to make an origami crane yourself.”

There was also a name a crane fund raising game to support the work of the Friends of St John’s School in Ely.

“Recovery does exist,” Laura said.

cranes exhibition

cranes exhibition - Credit: Archant

“It’s really hard to sum up my experience of postnatal depression,” said Laura on her fund raising page.

“Working within the charity sector, I know a compelling account that pulls at heart strings would do nicely- but this page is more of a thank you from me.

“A dedication to all the wonderful people in my life and new friends I made whilst ill that never judged.

“To all the charities large and small that played a significant part in my recovery and for all the darn hard work I put in, in taking back control of my health. A full recovery does exist.

“I don’t hold any blame but I do believe that my recovery would have come quicker if there was more wider public knowledge of the structures and procedures of the mental health care system before entering that circle - a circle once you’re in, you become dependent on and honestly it’s quite scary for the first time.

“I do also wish there had been more options other than medication readily available.

“Which brings me on nicely to the origami cranes fund raising exhibition. After several changes of medication, seven weeks in a mother and baby unit, a near fatal overdose that saw me in intensive care and after approximately my fifth admission to a mental health hospital, I was referred to an NHS Art therapist.

“I began my 12 week art therapy course under the illusion that I would be expected to churn out cliché paintings of how I feel, another form of counselling, or I would be witnessing moments like in the comedy sketch on ‘The Fast Show’ where the artist just paints everything black.

“The reality was quite the opposite. My weekly sessions turned into intellectual conversations about all manner of things, food for thought on my choices in my recovery and rekindling a passion and direction for my life with no pressure in having to ‘create’ a finished masterpiece every time.

“There’s one person I owe my huge thanks to in my recovery and that’s my beautiful darling daughter who recently turned four years old.

“I am fund raising for her future. A future I am proud to be a part of, which post natal depression nearly took me away from.”

Her exhibition was at Chequers Studio in Ely.

Laura’s fund raising page is here.

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