Soham woman devastated after hospital admits lack of monitoring prior to stillbirth

PUBLISHED: 14:53 17 January 2020 | UPDATED: 14:53 17 January 2020

A devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with ?enhanced care and monitoring? at hospital. Emma Tiley has started up her own group on Facebook called Rosie?s Angel Gowns. Picture: FAMILY

A devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with ?enhanced care and monitoring? at hospital. Emma Tiley has started up her own group on Facebook called Rosie?s Angel Gowns. Picture: FAMILY

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A devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital - meaning that her baby would have been born alive - an investigation found.

A devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital. Emma and Carl's children River and Rory. Picture: FAMILY



A devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital. Emma and Carl's children River and Rory. Picture: FAMILY

Emma Tiley, 34, was admitted to The Rosie Hospital in Cambridge on June 27 2014 when her waters broke at 27 weeks, but labour failed to progress.

She began to feel unwell and on July 3 and was advised she would undergo a caesarean section the following morning.

Sadly, early on July 4 medical staff could not find the baby's heartbeat and Emma was informed that her unborn daughter Rosie had died.

Following Rosie's death, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust conducted an investigation which found that she had died from "overwhelming sepsis."

A devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital. Emma has taken part in lots of fundraising since her stillbirth. Here she is after her 10K run. Picture: FAMILYA devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital. Emma has taken part in lots of fundraising since her stillbirth. Here she is after her 10K run. Picture: FAMILY

Emma and her husband Carl, who have two other children, instructed legal experts at Irwin Mitchell to investigate.

Their legal team has now secured a settlement from the Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust which admitted a "failure to provide a standard of treatment which could be reasonably expected."

The trust said that Emma should have been transferred to the delivery unit by 2am on July 4.

It further admitted that Emma should have been given "enhanced care and monitoring" during the early hours of July 4, with frequent checking of Rosie's heartbeat.

A devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital. Emma is pictured with Amie Minns from Irwin Mitchell and husband Carl. Picture: FAMILYA devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital. Emma is pictured with Amie Minns from Irwin Mitchell and husband Carl. Picture: FAMILY

Expert evidence obtained by her lawyers concluded that, had Emma received the correct monitoring during her time in hospital, staff would have discovered that baby Rosie was in distress.

A caesarean section would have been carried out earlier and Rosie would have been born alive.

Emma said: "Losing Rosie was truly horrific and a very difficult time for me and the whole family. I still have nightmares about it.

"After it happened, I attended counselling sessions at Petals which helped me with my grief.

A devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital. Emma has started up her own group on Facebook called Rosie’s Angel Gowns. Picture: FAMILYA devastated mother from Soham who suffered a stillbirth was not provided with “enhanced care and monitoring” at hospital. Emma has started up her own group on Facebook called Rosie’s Angel Gowns. Picture: FAMILY

"But I could not forget about Rosie, and when I was told that her death was down to sepsis, I did not question it and tried to move forward as best I could.

"To then find out that Rosie might still be here if we had been monitored properly left me devastated.

"Nothing will ever bring back my baby girl and that breaks my heart every day."

Emma has now started up her own group on Facebook called Rosie's Angel Gowns, making gowns for babies to be laid to rest in.

The gowns are made from the wedding dresses of mothers who have lost their babies and donated to local hospitals.

More information on the charities involved in Emma's fundraising can be found at https://petalscharity.org/, https://www.sands.org.uk/ and https://4louis.co.uk/

The trust did not want to comment further when contacted by the Ely Standard.

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