Decision To Slash County's Housing Budget Has Been Met With Widespread Anger

PUBLISHED: 17:04 30 July 2009 | UPDATED: 10:58 04 May 2010

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THE decision by the Government to slash millions of pounds promised to the county for vital new housing has been met with widespread anger. The Government announced last week it would be cutting £6 million from the county s Housing Growth Fund, money set

THE decision by the Government to slash millions of pounds promised to the county for vital new housing has been met with widespread anger.

The Government announced last week it would be cutting £6 million from the county's Housing Growth Fund, money set aside for thousands of new homes, provoking anger from members of the public, councillors and MPs alike.

Cambridgeshire had been due to receive almost £13,772,524 in 2010/11 but that figure has been cut by almost 50 per cent to around £7,794,623, with the money taken by the Government going towards other projects across the country.

Councillor Jill Tuck, leader of Cambridgeshire County Council, said: "I am incandescent about this. It is the worst case of robbing Peter to pay Paul I've ever seen. And yet again it is the Government's friends in the North and the Midlands who are set to benefit.

"Cutting our Housing Growth Fund capital allocation by almost £6 million will undoubtedly jeopardise the delivery of much needed housing in the county.

"This leaves all of us in a very difficult position, but the Minister can rest assured we intend to fight the proposal."

MP for South East Cambridgeshire, Jim Paice, said: "I fully agree with Councillor Tuck's assessment of the situation. Cambridgeshire is one of the fastest growing counties in England and delivery of new homes is essential yet promised funding has been reallocated elsewhere.

"The Government claim they are investing extra money in new housing but in reality are giving to housing with one hand whilst simultaneously taking from it with the other."

Though Cambridge County Council has vowed to fight the decision, councillors have admitted that hard won projects on the point of agreement with firms are now under threat while plans for future schemes are also at risk.


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