Damning care home report reveals all areas ‘require improvement’

Delph House in Welney “requires improvement”, says the Quality Care Commission.

Delph House in Welney “requires improvement”, says the Quality Care Commission. - Credit: Google Maps

Rusty commodes, poor record keeping and staff who refused mandatory training have been highlighted in a report on a Fenland care home.   

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) concludes Delph House at Welney “requires improvement”.    

The Wisbech Road home, with 19 residents, has been downgraded from its ‘good’ rating following an inspection two years ago.  

It was re-inspected this year following concerns over the safe care and treatment of residents.   

“The overall rating has changed from good to requires improvement. This is based on the findings at this inspection,” says the CQC.    


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Inspectors visited on March 31 and April 21 and spoke to staff and residents.    

Inspectors revealed that the home “did not ensure people were kept safe and protected from harm” and that “record keeping had not been completed in full in all areas.    

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“Commodes were evidenced to be rusty and unclean and pressure cushions used were unclean.   

“A previous incident occurred in November 2020 where staff were not clear on life saving steps to take in an emergency situation.    

“The service has had a high turnover of managers which have affected the oversite and direction the service had taken.    

“The provider had not taken relevant steps to ensure sufficient oversite during this time.”   

Employees spoken by the CQC praised agency staff who work alongside the existing team.    

"Staff who were non-compliant with their mandatory training have now been removed from the service,” said the report.    

“Regular agency staff were being used to support the service. Staff told us the agency staff ‘are brilliant, they don't stop’.”    

The report says equipment has become worn or damaged.  

“This damaged equipment presented an infection control risk to people,” added the CQC.   

“Sufficient oversite had not been maintained by the provider.”   

“Incidents including safeguarding concerns that had been raised to management had not been investigated, recorded or learnt from to reduce risks to people's safety.   

“At the last inspection the ‘is this service well led?’ question was rated as ‘good’.   

“At this inspection this key question has now deteriorated to ‘requires Improvement’.    

“This meant the service management and leadership was inconsistent. 

“Leaders and the culture they created did not always support the delivery of high-quality, person-centred care.”  

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