Curfew order for train-dodge teen

AN Ely teenager who caused chaos on the railway when she threatened to jump from a bridge is to receive treatment for her alcohol problem. Faye Szulc – who was drinking two bottles of vodka a day – cost the railway service around £5,000 when a series of t

AN Ely teenager who caused chaos on the railway when she threatened to jump from a bridge is to receive treatment for her alcohol problem.

Faye Szulc - who was drinking two bottles of vodka a day - cost the railway service around £5,000 when a series of trains became backed up around Ely because she refused to get down from the bridge.

The incident started when a train driver reported that he narrowly missed Szulc as she jumped away from the line as a train approached.

"All trains were put on caution, they had to stop and then proceed slowly," Ely magistrates were told by prosecutor Delia Matthews. "Two trains approached Faye Szulc on the tracks, and police were alerted. Services were affected, and an engineering train was delayed."


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When police arrived on the scene they found Szulc refusing to get down from a bridge, threatening to jump.

Seven police officers - including a specially trained negotiator - were called out to the incident on August 3, that lasted almost two hours.

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Nineteen-year-old Szulc, of Christopher Tye Close, Ely, had earlier admitted trespassing on the railway on August 3, breaching her anti-social behaviour order, and stealing two bottles of spirits from Waitrose in Ely.

"Here was someone crying out for assistance," said solicitor Jacqui Baldwin. "She has recently taken an overdose, and clearly has issues in relation to alcohol, mental health and depression."

Szulc has referred herself to Drinksense, she added, and has been attending appointments.

"There are quite a few people willing to give you some help," said presiding magistrate Hamish Ross. "It would be foolish for us to stand in their way."

Szulc was given a three-month curfew order, keeping her indoors between 7pm and 7am, and she must pay £100 costs.

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