Lack of charging points for electric vehicles in Fenland and East Cambridgeshire one of the barriers for take-up says RAC

PUBLISHED: 15:43 25 April 2019

Thinking of buying an electric car? Then Fenland or East Cambridgeshire may not be the best place in the country to do so. Picture: PA WIRE / PA IMAGES

Thinking of buying an electric car? Then Fenland or East Cambridgeshire may not be the best place in the country to do so. Picture: PA WIRE / PA IMAGES

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Thinking of buying an electric car? Then Fenland or East Cambridgeshire may not be the best place in the country to do so.

Thinking of buying an electric car? Then Fenland or East Cambridgeshire may not be the best place in the country to do so. Picture: PA WIRE / PA IMAGESThinking of buying an electric car? Then Fenland or East Cambridgeshire may not be the best place in the country to do so. Picture: PA WIRE / PA IMAGES

Figures from a research company show that Fenland has just five charging points for the 106 registered electric vehicles here.

East Cambridgeshire is even less well served with six charging points for 220 electric vehicles registered in the district.

Milton Keynes (138) has the highest number of charging points in the UK, followed by Westminster (131), and Cornwall (115).

The data has been provided by Open Charge Map, a global database of electric vehicle charging points.

The Government is encouraging councils and businesses to improve charging infrastructure and has made funds available through its £2.5million residential charge point scheme.

In 2018, the Government also launched its Road to Zero strategy, which aims for half of new cars and 40 per cent of new vans to be ultra-low emission by 2030.

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By 2040, all new cars and vans should also be electric or effectively zero-emission and new petrol and diesel cars will be phased out, the Government has said.

However, campaigners believe the Government is in danger of missing that target unless more is done to encourage better infrastructure for drivers of electric vehicles.

Nicholas Lyes, RAC head of roads policy, said: “Our research has found the lack of charging infrastructure is one of the three main barriers for electric vehicle take-up, along with range anxiety and high upfront vehicle costs.”

He added: “Clearly, we need to improve this access to charge points as a whole.

“Special attention needs to be given to installing more rapid chargers on the strategic road network as well as adding charging capability at car parks where people spend longer periods, such as at shopping and leisure centre car parks.

“We'd also like to see local authorities work more closely with the Government to find on-street charging solutions.”

He said the key was to give drivers the confidence to go electric “which will not happen quickly unless they are given the right incentives to do so, alongside easy access to reliable charging infrastructure”.

A Department for Transport spokesman said: “Our vision is to have one of the best infrastructure networks in the world for electric vehicles, and we want charge points to be accessible, affordable and secure.”

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