Amey push to win planning battle for new £100m energy from waste plant - despite public outcry

PUBLISHED: 10:27 09 December 2019 | UPDATED: 10:34 11 December 2019

Visualisation produced by Amey showing how their energy from waster incinerator might look once built at Waterbeach. Picture; AMEY

Visualisation produced by Amey showing how their energy from waster incinerator might look once built at Waterbeach. Picture; AMEY

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Amidst a massive outcry Amey still hopes to win planning permission for a new £100m energy from waste plant at Waterbeach.

Visualisation produced by Amey showing how their energy from waster incinerator might look once built at Waterbeach. Picture; AMEY Visualisation produced by Amey showing how their energy from waster incinerator might look once built at Waterbeach. Picture; AMEY

The incinerator would process 250,000 tonnes of household and commercial waste each year - generating enough energy in the form of heat and electricity to power 45,000 homes.

But outraged residents set up a campaign group against the proposals - which are now set to go to the Secretary of State in the New Year after planning permission was refused by Cambridgeshire County Council last September.

A three-week inquiry in November heard conflicting testimonies on the health and welfare of the economy.

The outcome will also be watched in Wisbech where Stephen Barclay has been at the front of a campaign against an incinerator being built there.

Visualisation produced by Amey showing how their energy from waster incinerator might look once built at Waterbeach. Picture; AMEY Visualisation produced by Amey showing how their energy from waster incinerator might look once built at Waterbeach. Picture; AMEY

Amey says that their energy from waste facility would help the county increase its recycling rates and reduce landfill while saving the county money and boosting its environmental credentials.

Paco Hevia, managing director of waste treatment, said: "We are seeing it as a benefit for the entire county and it will generate growth for the economy and a more sustainable community.

"The most important part is that it will reduce the carbon footprint.

"We do understand the concerns of residents but it is important to look at all the positive benefits this will bring to the area.

Visualisation produced by Amey showing how their energy from waster incinerator might look once built at Waterbeach. Picture; AMEYVisualisation produced by Amey showing how their energy from waster incinerator might look once built at Waterbeach. Picture; AMEY

"There will be the environment impact of moving away from landfill into energy from waste."

Dozens of jobs are set to be created from the build and once it is in full operation.

"The benefits that the facility will bring will out weigh any possible impact that it might have on residents," Mr Hevia said.

"There will be a significant number of jobs created with more than 60 for the actual operation of the plant and many more through the construction.

The protest group Cambridge Without Incineration (CBWIN) raised concerns over health and heritage of the area.

They said that "such an enormous industrial plant sited on the edge of historic Fenland villages would introduce overwhelming serious and significant harm to landscape, visual and heritage".

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