St George's Day Should Be About Chivalry

PUBLISHED: 14:00 30 April 2009 | UPDATED: 10:51 04 May 2010

YOUR article on the life of St George (April 23) ends before relating his relevance to the modern England. George was an officer in the Roman army and a Christian; during the last great bisection of the church he refused to renounce his faith and was mart

YOUR article on the life of St George (April 23) ends before relating his relevance to the modern England. George was an officer in the Roman army and a Christian; during the last great bisection of the church he refused to renounce his faith and was martyred near Tel Avivand a cult soon grew up around his tomb. It was at this time he acquired his princess and dragon by confession with the mythical Greek hero Perseus who was supposed to have saved a king's daughter from a sea monster in this region. King Richard 1 of England visited the shrine during the first Crusade and dedicated his crusading army to the saint, when the crusaders returned home, devotion to Saint George spread among the whole English army. The red cross on a white background became the soldiers' emblem. When King Edward 111 formed the Order of the Garter around 350AD he dedicate it to Saint George. Since the saint is the patron of chivalry it would be appropriate if we marked his festival by acts of courtesy and kindness to all womenfolk.

RAB Ewbank

Egremont Street

Ely.


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