I Confess: I'm A Hoader

PUBLISHED: 13:35 28 April 2010 | UPDATED: 13:26 02 June 2010

MY work colleagues have been giving me a hard time in the last few days because apparently I am a hoarder. I, of course, see things differently and would describe myself as more of a recycler. Admittedly my hoarding/recycling does require a certain amount

MY work colleagues have been giving me a hard time in the last few days because apparently I am a hoarder. I, of course, see things differently and would describe myself as more of a recycler. Admittedly my hoarding/recycling does require a certain amount of time and garage space but other than that it is not problematic and surely there is already too much waste in the world. I just can't understand the thinking behind throwing things out when they are in perfectly good working order, so consequently I do have quite a lot of bits and bobs in my garage. A few weeks ago I rescued a dinning room table and a television that were destined for the rubbish dump and this week I have found a good home for them, which pleases me no end. I take smaller items to car boot sales and the bigger things just sit there until someone needs them. Nothing wrong with any of that, is there?

I don't ever remember my parents buying washing machines, cookers, fridges or other large electrical items when I was a child. They must have done at some point of course, but I don't think it happened as regularly as it does these days where most people expect their electrical goods to have a lifespan of four or five years. My dad also used to fix things, whereas, advancements in technology can make repairs complicated, if not, impossible on modern electrical goods.

Did you know that UK households produce 30.5 million tonnes of waste each year and roughly 17% of that is recycled, which compares badly to other European countries. One recycled tin can save enough energy to power a television for three hours and one recycled glass bottle would save enough energy to power a computer for 25 minutes. Up to 60% of all rubbish that ends up in a dustbin could be recycled and on average 16% of the money you spend on a product pays for the package, which you then throw in the bin!. I know someone is going to email and ask, so I am happy to let you know that the Ely Standard is printed on recycled paper.

This weekend the city's Eel Festival takes place and there is lots going on. I will be one of the judges for the Town Crier competition which takes place in Jubilee Gardens and The Maltings on Saturday, but there will be plenty of entertainment during the weekend, including an 'eel' throwing competition and living history encampment and side stalls.

See Page 9 for full details of Eel Day activities and next week's Ely Standard for round-up and photos.


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