Coridander Bolted But Don't Worry The Parsley Is Doing Well

PUBLISHED: 09:59 15 April 2008 | UPDATED: 10:20 04 May 2010

ONE of the big pluses about living in Ely is the time that I have gained at each end of the day from not having to travel to and from work. Not only do I have more time in the mornings and evenings but I am not so tired when I walk through the door at nig

ONE of the big pluses about living in Ely is the time that I have gained at each end of the day from not having to travel to and from work. Not only do I have more time in the mornings and evenings but I am not so tired when I walk through the door at night, which has given me a new lease of life! I can't lie, dear reader, I haven't spent this new-found time on some exciting girlie pursuit or a hip-and-happening project I have, instead, taken up gardening. Now, I don't have a huge garden and there is no lawn. The area is a reasonable size, but mostly paved, although there are a couple of beds I have to grow most things in pots. But with a bit of help and inspiration from Jamie Oliver, I have already planted some rhubarb and herbs and I am busy clearing a patch for some fruit bushes. I bought one of those lean-to plastic greenhouse thingies for my seeds, well, I thought if the plants don't do well I could always use it as a shoe rack. I have no idea what I am doing and everything is trial and error. I plant, water and hope for the best and if my greenery is still alive a couple of weeks after planting I feel a great sense of achievement. There have been a couple of disasters already, my coriander bolted and went all stringy and my basil failed to materialise but the mint and parsley I planted at the same time are looking very healthy. If you have any tips or would like to pass on any cuttings I would be very grateful.

Now, it wouldn't be very neighbourly of me not to invite you, my new neighbours, round for a cup of tea or coffee would it? So, I have organised a coffee morning on April 24 at the Ely Standard. I will be charging for the coffee as we are trying to raise some money for Liam Fairhurst and the CLIC Sargent charity, but in order to extend the hand of friendship to my new neighbours in East Cambs I will be handing out some home-made cakes, and if I say so myself I do make a good carrot cake. I wish I could say the carrots will be fresh from the garden, but they won't, they will be as fresh as it's possible to be from the supermarket. Please come along between 10am and noon, and if you would like to donate a raffle prize it would be very much appreciated.

I have also organised some breakfast meetings at the office and my first breakfast guest was Tracey Harding, who is the tourism officer for East Cambs District Council. I asked Tracey to come in and talk to me about Eel Day and once we had finished eating, she talked all things eel. Eel Day is a perfect example of everything that is good about Ely. All that goodwill and enthusiasm (and slight quirkiness) that exists in the local area to make things happen and Tracey Harding has bucket loads of enthusiasm for this event. From small beginnings four years ago, the event is developing each year and this year's event will include the new Waits group which has been revived to celebrate Ely's rich history. You can read more about the group on Page 4 of this week's paper. Events like this would not be possible were it not for the energy of people like Tracey and it was lovely to share some time with her...even if her Eel stories did put me off my lunch.

INFO: Eel Day is on May 3. Look out for details in the Ely Standard.

Email: debbie.davies@archant.co.uk

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