Prime Minister calls snap election for June 8 - her announcement stunned Westminster

PUBLISHED: 12:18 18 April 2017 | UPDATED: 12:18 18 April 2017

Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement in Downing Street, London, announcing a snap general election on June 8. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday April 18, 2017. See PA story POLITICS May. Photo credit: Philip Toscano/PA Wire

Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement in Downing Street, London, announcing a snap general election on June 8. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday April 18, 2017. See PA story POLITICS May. Photo credit: Philip Toscano/PA Wire

Theresa May has called a snap election for June 8 following a surprise announcement outside Downing Street.

SE Cambs General Election result 2015SE Cambs General Election result 2015

The move stunned Westminster, as Mrs May and Number 10 have repeatedly insisted she would not seek a general election before the scheduled 2020 poll.

But Mrs May, who has a fragile working majority of just 17 in the Commons, said she wanted “unity” at Westminster as talks on Brexit begin in earnest with the European Union.

She said: “We want a deep and special partnership between a strong and successful European Union and a United Kingdom that is free to chart its own way in the world.

“That means we will regain control of our own money, our own laws and our own borders and we will be free to strike trade deals with old friends and new partners all around the world.

NE Cambs General Election results 2015NE Cambs General Election results 2015

“This is the right approach, and it is in the national interest. But the other political parties oppose it.

“At this moment of enormous national significance there should be unity here in Westminster, but instead there is division. The country is coming together, but Westminster is not.”

She acknowledged that she needed a stronger position in the Commons to secure her plans for the UK’s future outside the EU.

“Our opponents believe because the Government’s majority is so small that our resolve will weaken and that they can force us to change. They are wrong,” she said.

“They under-estimate our determination to get the job done and I am not prepared to let them endanger the security of millions of working people across the country, because what they are doing jeopardises the work we must do to prepare for Brexit at home and it weakens the Government’s negotiating position in Europe.”

Under the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act, general elections take place every five years, meaning Mrs May would have had to carry on until 2020 before the chance to strengthen her position.

In order to call the early election, she will need the support of two-thirds of the 650 MPs in the Commons - but Labour is expected to support her, as any opposition would look weak if it did not agree to the chance to take office.

Senior Tories have urged Mrs May to call an early election, taking advantage of the Conservatives’ healthy opinion poll lead over Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour.

Mrs May suggested she reached her decision over the Easter parliamentary recess - during which she went on a walking holiday in North Wales.

“I have only recently and reluctantly come to this conclusion,” the PM said.

“Since I became Prime Minister I have said that there should be no election until 2020.

“But now I have concluded that the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold this election and seek your support for the decisions I must take.”

Previously Downing Street had always denied she would call a vote before the next scheduled poll in 2020, despite pressure for senior Conservative figures, such as William Hague who believed it “would strengthen the government’s hand at home and abroad”.

The last time a Prime Minister willingly called a snap election was in 1974 when Harold Wilson called one just months after Labour’s victory. Labour subsequently held onto power.

There was a snap election in 1979 but that one was caused by a vote of no confidence in James Callaghan’s Labour government.

1 comment

  • Now we know. We are to have a General Election as well as County Council Elections (and a Mayoral Election in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough). I used to be a Conservative supporter and a Conservative activist. I now have NO confidence in the Conservatives at County level, NO confidence in the Conservative at Mayoral level, NO confidence in the Conservative at Constituency level and NO confidence in the Conservatives at national level. I will NOT vote Conservative. I will support ‘Anybody But Conservative.’ ‘D Day’ is to be the 8th of June. ‘D’ for me is DOWN with the Conservatives.

    Report this comment

    Geoffrey Woollard

    Tuesday, April 18, 2017

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

More news stories

Voters in Soham North Ward have chosen a new councillor following the resignation of the previous representative, James Palmer, who stood down after becoming the new mayor for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

14:48

Influential artist David Hockney is holding a selling exhibition of 40 original prints at Babylon Gallery in Ely.

13:00

An Ely writer has won a top book prize and £10,000 for his debut novel.

12:39

Ambitious plans to regenerate Wisbech are a ‘once in a lifetime window of opportunity’ to transform the town and its community.

Most read stories

Most commented stories

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Ely Standard e-edition E-edition
HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter