Green light for tattoo artist to move into town’s High Street

PUBLISHED: 22:06 09 March 2014 | UPDATED: 22:06 09 March 2014

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A former dry cleaners in Soham is set to become a tattoo parlour after a developer’s plans were approved by East Cambridgeshire District Council.

Richard Foy applied last month for permission to change the use of 8A High Street – which was formerly Swifts Dry Cleaners – into a studio for tattooing.

Mr Foy said the new studio would create two jobs.

In consultation with planners, Soham Town Council said it was concerned that there was “already a tattoo shop in Soham High Street”.

And John Knappett, proprietor of Body Graphics, a tattoo shop which has been in Soham for more than 20 years, added: “We object to another tattooist setting up trade five doors away from our family-run business.

“We are already competing with six unregistered tattooists working from home in the Soham area. This is a specialised trade and we do not think Soham needs another tattooist in the High Street as it is a small town.”

But there was also plenty of support for the plans from neighbours.

Leah Badcock, of Soham, told the council: “Soham is growing in size and becoming more and more popular. I believe there is a huge market for the superior skills Mr Foy has to offer.”

And Nathan Cox, of Ely, added: “It’s a brilliant opportunity, bringing the town good business and healthy competition, with a wide range of tattooing styles. As the town grows it needs new faces.”

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